Access Management , Breach Notification , Fraud Management & Cybercrime

How Old Breaches Fuel New Identity Crimes

Jim Van Dyke and Al Pascual of Sontiq Describe Criminals' Use of Breached Data
Jim Van Dyke (left) and Al Pascual of Sontiq

Identity crimes are up, but data breaches are down. What does this mean for risk mitigation strategies? Jim Van Dyke and Al Pascual of Sontiq offer an analysis.

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”If identity crime is up, and breaches are down, cybercriminals are using more historical breached data at a higher rate,” Van Dyke says. “Therefore, industry practitioners need to put even more focus on historical data compromise because historical data is enabling more future identity crimes. And we can now use that data to predict the pattern of identity crimes we will see in the future”

In a video interview with Information Security Media Group, Van Dyke and Pascual discuss:

  • Shifting trends in data breaches and the implications for identity crimes;
  • Why data breaches need a “Richter Scale” to assess future impacts;
  • Sontiq's acquisition of Breach Clarity.

Van Dyke is senior vice president of digital financial wellness at Sontiq, which he joined after the company acquired Breach Clarity, where he was founder and CEO. Earlier, he founded Javelin Strategy & Research, where he served as CEO for 12 years. He serves as a board member for the Identity Theft Resource Center and is a former board member of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Pascual is senior vice president of data breach solutions at Sontiq, which he joined after the firm acquired Breach Clarity, which he co-founded. Previously, he served as head of fraud and security for Javelin Strategy & Research, where he directed the company’s research and analysis on consumer identity theft trends. Prior to Javelin, he led investigations into cases of organized payment fraud at FIS.


About the Author

Nick Holland

Nick Holland

Director, Editorial

Holland, an experienced security analyst, has spent the last decade focusing on the intersection of digital banking, payments and security technologies. He has spoken at a variety of conferences and events, including Mobile World Congress, Money2020, Next Bank and SXSW, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, MSNBC, NPR, Forbes, Fortune, BusinessWeek, Time Magazine, The Economist and the Financial Times. He holds an MSc degree in information systems management from the University of Stirling, Scotland.




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