CHIP (COMPUTER HACKING AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY - FACT SHEET)

HISTORY

Nine additional units will be added to a program called CHIP (Computer Hacking and Intellectual Property) that has proven successful in Northern California. That project demonstrated the benefits of a unit of prosecutors working closely with the FBI and other agencies to establish a relationship with the local high tech community and encourage them to refer cases to law enforcement. In addition, the project provides the skills and training not yet available to law enforcement on a widespread basis.

See Also: IoT is Happening Now: Are You Prepared?

The new CHIP units are the next phase in the Department's ongoing efforts to combat cybercrime and Intellectual Property theft. In 1991, the Department created what is now the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) in the Criminal Division. This Section is comprised of 22 attorneys who specialize in these crimes and provide national training, advice and coordinate prosecution of computer intrusion and intellectual property cases. The CHIP team members will complement the highly trained network of prosecutors at CCIPS and the US Attorneys’ Offices.

PROGRAM DETAILS

CHIP units will be established in eight cities in addition to San Francisco, where the concept was pioneered. The cities have been chosen based on a number of factors, including their proximity to high-tech industry areas, their potential for growth in that area and the presence of adequate FBI resources to investigate these crimes.

-Los Angeles -Dallas
-San Diego -Seattle
-Atlanta -Alexandria, Virginia
-Boston  
-New York (Brooklyn and Manhattan)  

• Together, the 10 units will have a total of 77 positions, including 48 prosecutors.
• This will provide 4 to 6 prosecutors in each participating district, through combining new and existing resources in the selected districts.

RESOURCES

The FY 2001 Appropriation provided $3,074,000 to fund 50 positions and 25 FTE, including 28 attorneys.


The following chart shows the proposed unit composition:

Districts
New AUSA
Allocation
"AUSA"
District Match
Total
CHIP
AUSAs
New
Paralegal
Allocation
New Support
Allocation
"Support"
District Match
Unit Position
Total
California CD
2
4
6
1
1
2
10
California ND
4
2
6
1
2
1
10
California SD
2
2
4
1
1
2
8
Georgia ND
3
1
4
0
2
0
6
Massachusetts
2
2
4
0
2
0
6
New York ED
2
2
4
0
2
0
6
New York SD
3
2
5
0
1
1
7
Texas ND
3
1
4
0
2
0
6
Virginia ED
4
2
6
1
2
1
10
Washington WD
3
2
5
0
2
1
8
Total
28
20
48
4
17
8
77

COMPONENTS

The program has 3 components: (1) Prosecution, (2) Regional Prevention and Outreach and (3) Regional Training.

1. Prosecution
• CHIP units will prosecute computer intrusions, copyright and trademark violations, theft of trade secrets and economic espionage, theft of computer and high tech components and other Internet crimes.

2. Regional Prevention and Outreach
• Prosecutors will work with CCIPS, the FBI and other agencies to establish good working relationships with the high tech community and to encourage victims of high tech crime to report such crimes to law enforcement.

3. Regional Training
• Cybercrime fighting requires special skills. CHIP units will receive the same high-level training provided by CCIPS, but will also be expected to develop and offer regional training programs to increase expertise among federal, state and local prosecutors.

• CHIP units will also be encouraged to send attorneys to work at CCIPS to train, and to call upon CCIPS for assistance in providing local training.
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Go to . . . CCIPS home page || Justice Department home page


Updated page December 9, 2002
usdoj-crm/mis/krr


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