Avoiding BYOD?

Why Setting BYOD Policies Is Increasingly Critical

Bring-your-own-device concerns are getting more complex, but most organizations aren't keeping up with the times, and their outdated policies and procedures prove it, says John Whaley of Moka5.

See Also: Meeting FFIEC Guidelines: Roadmap for Securing Regulated Data at Rest and in Motion

In fact, BYOD security and best practices are often talked about more than they are implemented and used, he says.

BYOD is not just about ensuring employees are using secure devices, Whaley says. It's about ensuring corporations are protecting intellectual property when employees access their databases from home. And BYOD also is about not violating employees' privacy by inadvertently accessing personal data on devices they own.

During this interview recorded at RSA 2014, Whaley discusses:

  • How automation can enhance BYOD management;
  • Why organizations are reluctant to even broach the topic of BYOD;
  • How regulators may soon mandate certain BYOD policies and procedures.

Whaley serves as the founder and chief technology officer of Moka5 and is responsible for the technical vision of the company. Whaley previously worked at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center and Tokyo Research Lab. He also was named one of the top 15 programmers in the USA Computing Olympiad.

About the Author

Tracy Kitten

Tracy Kitten

Executive Editor, BankInfoSecurity & CUInfoSecurity

A veteran journalist with more than 18 years' experience, Kitten has covered the financial sector for the last 11 years. Before joining Information Security Media Group in 2010, where she now serves as the Executive Editor of BankInfoSecurity and CUInfoSecurity, she covered the financial self-service industry as the senior editor of ATMmarketplace, part of Networld Media. Kitten has been a regular speaker at domestic and international conferences, and was the keynote at ATMIA's U.S. and Canadian conferences in 2009. She has been quoted by, ABC News, and MSN Money.

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